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Sex Workers Have Human Rights Too

Sex Workers Have Human Rights Too

By Stacey-Leigh Manoek and Gcobisa Silwana South African law criminalises sex work. In terms of the law both the sex worker and the client commit offences, yet it is sex workers who bear the consequences of this criminal status. This is one of many cases where sex workers experience human rights violations at the hands of [...]

Gendered Poverty: A Role for the Right to Social Security

By Beth Goldblatt The welfare safety net has been eroded in many developed countries over recent decades. Since the global financial crisis, austerity measures involving welfare cutbacks have worsened poverty in a number of European nations. This crisis has also had a major impact on the economies of the developing world, leading to food insecurity, [...]

Public Duties and Private Schools: the Indian Supreme Court’s Landmark Ruling

Public Duties and Private Schools: the Indian Supreme Court’s Landmark Ruling

Problems of affordability and access have perennially plagued the Indian educational system. State-run schools, while affordable, have suffered from a severe absence of quality in every respect; and private schools have been beyond the financial reach of a vast majority of Indians. Over the years, the government and the judiciary undertook many efforts to rectify [...]

The Rise of South Africa’s Education Adequacy Movement

The Rise of South Africa’s Education Adequacy Movement

This week we feature news on recent education rights litigation in South Africa and India.  In this piece, Chris McConnachie discusses the emergence of the education adequacy movement in South Africa, which is increasingly using litigation in an attempt to improve conditions in schools. South Africa is a pioneer in the recognition and enforcement of [...]

SCOPPOLA v. ITALY (No. 3): A Step Backwards

In her recent post, Natasha Holcroft-Emmess critiques the European Court of Human Rights Grand Chamber (GC) judgment in Scoppola (no. 3); she rightly notes that the GC has taken a step backwards in terms of protecting prisoners’ voting rights. Unbound by constraints of Strasbourg jurisprudence, I have made elsewhere ‘the case for letting prisoners vote’, arguing [...]

Scoppola v Italy (No. 3): Getting Prisoner Voting Right?

In Scoppola v Italy (No. 3) (Application no. 126/05, 22 May 2012) the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights once again engaged with the vexed issue of prisoners’ voting rights. Italian legislation permanently disenfranchised prisoners convicted of specific offences against the State and those sentenced to more than five years’ incarceration. The [...]

Election of the new Belgian Judge to the ECtHR: An all-male short list demonstrates questionable commitment to gender equality

Election of the new Belgian Judge to the ECtHR: An all-male short list demonstrates questionable commitment to gender equality

  On the 24thApril 2012, the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) elected the new Belgian judge to the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), Paul Lemmens, from an all male short list presented to PACE by the Belgian Government, in contravention of its Council of Europe obligations. Although the European Convention does [...]

Article 14 ECHR: the Elusive Other Status

Article 14 ECHR: the Elusive Other Status

The recent judgment of Swift v Secretary of State for Justice [2012] EWHC 2000 (QB) raises some interesting questions regarding the operation of article 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights (“ECHR”). The case concerned a claim for tortious damages under s1(3)(b) Fatal Accidents Act 1976. As the claimant, the deceased’s unmarried partner, had not [...]

Elusive Equalities Workshop: Registration Now Open

Elusive Equalities Workshop: Registration Now Open

The Oxford Human Rights Hub (OxHRH) is hosting its inaugural workshop, ‘Elusive Equalities: Sex, Gender and Women’, from 11-12 September at Pembroke College in Oxford. The workshop will explore current challenges to achieving gender equality and how human rights frameworks can be used to address these challenges. There is an exciting line-up of speakers and participants, including leading [...]

Mind the Gap: the Joan Fitzpatrick Memorial Lecture on Poverty and Equality delivered by Professor Sandra Fredman

Mind the Gap: the Joan Fitzpatrick Memorial Lecture on Poverty and Equality delivered by Professor Sandra Fredman

On 24 July 2012, Professor Sandra Fredman delivered the 9th annual Joan Fitzpatrick Memorial Lecture. In light of an austere economic climate, Professor Fredman delivered a timely call for a new understanding of substantive equality that can cast light on the experience of poverty and the ways law can address it. She argued that the [...]

A Quick Overview

Blog posts have been coming in thick and fast over the last month. To help you get up to speed, the editorial team has put together a quick summary of some of the major themes. Justice Verma Committee on Indian sexual violence laws The Justice Verma Committee submitted its report on the reform of India’s [...]