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Yordanova and others v Bulgaria: an Illustration of the Absence of Watertight Divisions Between the Social Right to Adequate Housing and the Civil Right to Respect for one’s Home.

Yordanova and others v Bulgaria: an Illustration of the Absence of Watertight Divisions Between the Social Right to Adequate Housing and the Civil Right to Respect for one’s Home.

By Adélaïde Remiche – On 24 April 2012, the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) handed down a unanimous judgment in the case of Yordanova and others v Bulgaria, in which it ruled against Bulgaria for its attempt to remove Bulgarian nationals of Roma origin from their homes which had been unlawfully built on a municipal [...]

George Galloway’s Walkout and Discrimination on the Basis of Nationality

George Galloway’s Walkout and Discrimination on the Basis of Nationality

On the 20th of February, George Galloway, MP for Bradford West, walked out of a debate at Christ Church, Oxford. He arrived (an hour and a half late) in order to debate Eylon Aslan-Levy (a finalist reading Politics, Philosophy and Economics at Brasenose College). Upon realising that Levy was an Israeli citizen, he announced: ‘I don’t [...]

Protecting the Labour Rights and Human Rights of Migrant Domestic Workers – A Labour Regulation Approach

Protecting the Labour Rights and Human Rights of Migrant Domestic Workers – A Labour Regulation Approach

By Professor Judy Fudge – Women who cross national borders in order to work in the households of other peoples’ families are very vulnerable to exploitation.Their precarious work situation is a function both of their precarious migrant status – typically they are admitted to the country in which they work on visas that tie their [...]

Congratulations to the Oxford Jessup Moot Team

Congratulations to the Oxford Jessup Moot Team

The Oxford Human Rights Hub congratulates the University of Oxford team for defeating the University of Cambridge in the final of the UK National Championship of the 54th Phillip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition held in London on 17 February 2013. Shreya Atrey, a DPhil candidate and OxHRH participant, coached the team to [...]

Hacking, blagging and bribing? The press after Leveson

Hacking, blagging and bribing? The press after Leveson

By Hugh Tomlinson QC – Hacking, blagging and bribing were, for many years, standard journalistic techniques in parts of the British press.  Their exposure led to continuing police investigations, over 100 arrests, several criminal prosecutions and the Leveson inquiry.  These criminal techniques were accompanied by intrusion, bullying, inaccuracy and a range of other abuses by [...]

Weakening Protections for Victims of Gender-Based Violence in the United States?

Weakening Protections for Victims of Gender-Based Violence in the United States?

By Chelsea Purvis – The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) is the principle federal law addressing gender-based violence in the United States.  But for the first time since its enactment in 1994, VAWA’s reauthorization faces substantial opposition. In 1994 VAWA created a national framework for preventing and responding to gender-based violence (GBV), filling gaps in [...]

Stuck in Traffic?

Stuck in Traffic?

By Professor Bridget Anderson - ‘Trafficking’ seems to extend the audience of those engaged with the human rights of migrants. Even those who are not usually sympathetic to the plight of undocumented migrants can engage with the plight of ‘victims of trafficking’ and respond to calls for their protection. Trafficking also seems to offer a rare patch [...]

Violence Against Women in South Africa: President Zuma and the ANC Still Have Not Got the Message

Violence Against Women in South Africa: President Zuma and the ANC Still Have Not Got the Message

By Nabihah Iqbal – The recent tragedy of Anene Booysen has brought widespread attention to the pandemic of violence, especially sexual violence, against women in South Africa, a country labelled by Interpol as the ‘rape capital of the world’, and where it is estimatedthat a woman is raped every 17 seconds. Booysen’s case has been [...]

Death Penalty in India: What the Future Holds

Death Penalty in India: What the Future Holds

By Vrinda Bhandari – Constitutionally speaking, the death penalty in India is limited to the “rarest of the rare” cases and should be implemented in a time frame which is not “unjust, unfair and unreasonable”. Over the last two decades, hangings had become somewhat of a rarity. Since 2004, an informal moratorium seemed to have [...]

Solidarity, fair sharing of responsibility, and refugee protection in the EU

Solidarity, fair sharing of responsibility, and refugee protection in the EU

Article 80 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) requires that asylum policies of the Union and their implementation be governed by the principle of solidarity and fair sharing of responsibility among the Member States.  The EU is currently in the process of finalising its legislative package for the Common European [...]

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A Quick Overview

Blog posts have been coming in thick and fast over the last month. To help you get up to speed, the editorial team has put together a quick summary of some of the major themes. Justice Verma Committee on Indian sexual violence laws The Justice Verma Committee submitted its report on the reform of India’s [...]