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Legal Aid Cuts: A Student Perspective

Legal Aid Cuts: A Student Perspective

By Meghan Campbell and Arthur Chan  Oxford Legal Assistance (OLA) is an undergraduate and postgraduate legal aid scheme, run out of the University of Oxford and is partnered with Turpin and Miller LLP, a local legal aid firm. OLA runs a weekly clinic session which provides free preliminary consultation sessions for individuals in need of [...]

It’s Time to Wake Up – UK Legal Aid Cuts

It’s Time to Wake Up – UK Legal Aid Cuts

Like many law academics I suppose I had grown tired of well-heeled QCs claiming that this or that change to legal services spelt doom for their profession when what they really meant (I invariably thought) was slightly less money to spend on a second home. Lawyers have cried wolf so often it is hard to [...]

The Promise of Cash Transfers from Mineral Resource Wealth

The Promise of Cash Transfers from Mineral Resource Wealth

  It’s a place of darkness. People hail from tribes and clans. They are poor and live in basic shelters in remote villages, with no running water or electricity, and no access to clinics. They subsist on seasonal work, hunting and fishing. They resent that their part of the earth gets attention only when natural [...]

One Step Forward, Two Steps Back: Constitution-Making and Voter Education in Zimbabwe

One Step Forward, Two Steps Back: Constitution-Making and Voter Education in Zimbabwe

By Obert Hodzi Over the past decade, Zimbabwe has been characterised by political turmoil and economic meltdown that resulted in dollarization and abandonment of the country’s currency in 2008. After the disputed and violent elections of March and June 2008, political parties in Zimbabwe entered into a Global Political Agreement (GPA) to address the challenges [...]

Justice and Security Act 2013: Impact on Open Justice and Trial Rights

Justice and Security Act 2013: Impact on Open Justice and Trial Rights

  On the 25th of April 2013, the Justice and Security Act was granted Royal Assent after the Bill’s tumultuous progression through the parliamentary drafting stages. Part 2 of the Act regulates disclosure of sensitive material under the closed material procedure (CMP), where one party and their legal representation are excluded from evidence or allegations [...]

Stealing Brides in Kyrgyzstan: Why Multiculturalism and Women’s Rights Make Such Uneasy Bedfellows

Stealing Brides in Kyrgyzstan: Why Multiculturalism and Women’s Rights Make Such Uneasy Bedfellows

Liz Fouksman uses the case of bride kidnapping in Kyrgyzstan to delve into the uneasy intersection of culture and women’s rights highlighted by the debates at the UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW57) meetings this spring.   Kyrgyzstan is a small mountainous country which once formed the edge of the Soviet Union, wedged [...]

Denied Education is Denied Survival: The Case of The Nasa People

Denied Education is Denied Survival: The Case of The Nasa People

By Ethel Castellanos-Morales and Camilo Castillo-Sánchez – Colombia is a country with a modern constitutional system that allows it to recognize its different ethnic groups and protect the diversity that is inherent in this multicultural society.  Human rights are further protected by the fact that Colombia integrates several international human rights treaties in the constitution [...]

Public Interest Law in South Africa

Public Interest Law in South Africa

By Justice Dhaya Pillay I am troubled by the inequality in our society despite our grand Constitution. My concern is that the impact of apartheid plagues black and poor people who seem reticent about challenging their circumstances. Public interest law practised strategically has and could continue to advance our constitutional project. My definition of public [...]

The Role of Civil Society in the Execution of ECtHR Judgments

The Role of Civil Society in the Execution of ECtHR Judgments

By Victoria Prais European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) judgments  can have a huge impact in Member States by highlighting systemic and serious problems in human rights protection. But what happens once the initial furore over an ECtHR judgment dies down?  The implementation process is critical to the success of the ECtHR system. The Committee [...]

Rendering Abortion Unconstitutional? Article 28 of Zambia’s New Draft Constitution

Rendering Abortion Unconstitutional? Article 28 of Zambia’s New Draft Constitution

By Yaliwe Clarke Given international gains in legislation that protects women’s right to abortion, it is concerning that Zambia’s current draft constitution has put this matter back into national political debate. Due to the inclusion of Article 28 (1) in the new draft constitution that states that “…life begins at conception,” a new and seemingly [...]

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