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Guantanamo Military Commissions: Reflections from a Legal Observer – Part 3

Guantanamo Military Commissions: Reflections from a Legal Observer – Part 3

Editor’s note: This is the third and final post of a multi-part blog. To view earlier posts on this subject, please view Part I and Part II. In my last post, I laid out reasons why Guantanamo detainees currently before military commissions should be tried in federal court.  Of course, some counter arguments to this [...]

Provoking Debate: The UN Special Rapporteur and the Right to Housing in the UK

Provoking Debate: The UN Special Rapporteur and the Right to Housing in the UK

The right to housing seldom captures the public imagination or the media spotlight.  Yet the visit of the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Housing to the UK earlier this month, and the government reaction to it, is a timely reminder that housing sits at the centre of big political questions the UK must [...]

The Need for ‘Hard Evidence’ of Public Sector Equality Duty Outcomes

The Need for ‘Hard Evidence’ of Public Sector Equality Duty Outcomes

The Public Sector Equality Duty (PSED) Review report, published 6th September, was met with cautious relief.  Until it was issued, many charity and campaigning groups were concerned the Duty, which requires public bodies to have due regard for need to eliminate discrimination and advance equality for people from different groups, would be abolished.  However, the [...]

Guantanamo Military Commissions: Reflections from a Legal Observer – Part 2

Guantanamo Military Commissions: Reflections from a Legal Observer – Part 2

There is perhaps no more controversial space in the world than the U.S. Naval Station at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. For many, Guantanamo represents the very worst of the American prosecution of its post-9/11 conflict: executive overreach, detainee abuse and neglect, and modest judicial oversight.  As noted in Part I of this three-part post, Guantanamo, a military [...]

Mmusi Ruling a Watershed Moment for Gender and Customary Law in Botswana and Beyond

Mmusi Ruling a Watershed Moment for Gender and Customary Law in Botswana and Beyond

On September 3rd, the Court of Appeal in Botswana decided that Edith Mmusi’s parents’ home belonged to her and her sisters. In doing so, Botswana’s highest court struck a blow to rigid versions of customary law and breathed new meaning into the Botswana Constitution’s provisions to prevent unfair discrimination. Edith Mmusi’s story Edith Mmusi, 80, [...]

Criminalising Cross-Dressing in Guyana: Quincy McEwan et al vs. Attorney General of Guyana

Criminalising Cross-Dressing in Guyana: Quincy McEwan et al vs. Attorney General of Guyana

2013 has been a busy year for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights (LGBT) in the Commonwealth Caribbean. As noted in a previous post by activist and attorney-at-law Maurice Tomlinson, there is a series of cases in which laws that adversely affect the Caribbean LGBT are being challenged in the courts. In one of those [...]

Bugmy v The Queen: Exploring the Significance of Indigenous Background in Sentencing

Bugmy v The Queen: Exploring the Significance of Indigenous Background in Sentencing

Bugmy v The Queen provides the High Court of Australia with its first opportunity in thirty years to rule on the significance of Indigenous background in sentencing. The overrepresentation of Indigenous offenders in Australian prisons has doubled in the last twenty years: in the early 1990s indigenous offenders represented 14 per cent of the prison population, today they [...]

The Québec Charter of Values Project: Republican or Immigrant-phobic?

The Québec Charter of Values Project: Republican or Immigrant-phobic?

Tuesday, September 10 2013, the Government of Québec finally released its Strategy aimed at protecting the Values of the nation. It is important to say that this document is neither a bill nor a policy paper, yet. A strategy, in the new brave world of political communication, is a prompt aimed at assessing voters’ reaction [...]

The CEDAW Committee Holds an Uncomfortable Mirror to the UK

The CEDAW Committee Holds an Uncomfortable Mirror to the UK

On July 26th, 2013 the CEDAW Committee released concluding observations on the UK’s compliance with CEDAW. The UK is obligated to publicize the findings of the Committee, although the Concluding Observations have received very little media attention. In the Seventh Concluding Observation, the Committee demonstrates a keen understanding of the major governmental policies in the [...]

Guantanamo Military Commissions: Reflections from a Legal Observer – Part 1

Guantanamo Military Commissions: Reflections from a Legal Observer – Part 1

There is perhaps no more controversial space in the world than the U.S. Naval Station at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. For many, Guantanamo represents the very worst of the American prosecution of its post-9/11 conflict: executive overreach, detainee abuse and neglect, and modest judicial oversight.  In the purported balance between liberty and security, Guantanamo has come [...]

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A Quick Overview

Blog posts have been coming in thick and fast over the last month. To help you get up to speed, the editorial team has put together a quick summary of some of the major themes. Justice Verma Committee on Indian sexual violence laws The Justice Verma Committee submitted its report on the reform of India’s [...]