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Unpaid Interns in the New York Courts: Time to Start Spreading the News?

Unpaid Interns in the New York Courts: Time to Start Spreading the News?

Seen most cynically, employers deploy the label “intern” to give the impression that worker protection laws do not apply to people who look very much like workers, relying on financial and organisational barriers which prevent interns launching court challenges. A string of recent lawsuits brought by interns in New York marks a bold attempt to [...]

European Court of Human Rights Says Dismissal of HIV-positive Employee is Incompatible with the Convention

European Court of Human Rights Says Dismissal of HIV-positive Employee is Incompatible with the Convention

In the case of I.B. v. Greece, the European Court of Human Rights held that the dismissal of an HIV-positive employee due to pressure exercised by his fellow employees on the employer to dismiss him was incompatible with the European Convention on Human Rights. The applicant was working for a jewellery manufacturer. He confessed to [...]

Marikana Funding Decision – A Victory for Justice, Fairness and Equality

Marikana Funding Decision – A Victory for Justice, Fairness and Equality

In the wake of the Marikana tragedy, during which 40 striking mineworkers were shot and killed by the South African Police Service (“SAPS”), the Commission of Inquiry subsequently established by the President has been marred with problems. On 1 October 2012, its very first day of operation, the Inquiry continued with its proceedings despite the [...]

UN Resolution on Women’s Involvement in Conflict-Prevention: a Move Towards Participative Equality for Women in Conflict Zones

UN Resolution on Women’s Involvement in Conflict-Prevention: a Move Towards Participative Equality for Women in Conflict Zones

Earlier this month, the UN Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution 2122, designed to highlight the importance of women’s involvement in conflict prevention, resolution and peace-building. The adoption of this Resolution represents a continuation in the UN’s focus on the role of women in conflict zones, which began with Resolution 1325 on women and peace and [...]

Wedding Crashers in Canberra?

Wedding Crashers in Canberra?

The Australian Capital Territory made Australian history this week as the first Australian jurisdiction to provide for same-sex marriage. The ACT, Australia’s equivalent of the US District of Columbia, first announced plans to legislate on marriage equality in September, and the first marriages under the laws could take place later this year. But there is [...]

Bridging The Divide? Integrating the Functions of National Equality Bodies and National Human Rights Institutions in the EU

Bridging The Divide? Integrating the Functions of National Equality Bodies and National Human Rights Institutions in the EU

National equality bodies (NEBs) and national human rights institutions (NHRIs) play important roles in promoting respect for human dignity and fundamental rights in many European states. NEBs promote respect for the principle of equal treatment and help victims of discrimination to obtain a remedy under national and EU anti-discrimination law. NHRIs promote respect for human [...]

New Bill Shifts Focus to Survivors of Human Trafficking

New Bill Shifts Focus to Survivors of Human Trafficking

Earlier this year, I interviewed a group of young Bangladeshi men who had been trafficked into Scotland to work in the hotel services industry.  They had been deceived, abused, exploited and threatened into working under forced labour conditions, some of them for months, others for years. As they revealed the harrowing circumstances of their stories, [...]

The Tasmanian Dams Case, 30 Years On – Unfulfilled Promises

The Tasmanian Dams Case, 30 Years On – Unfulfilled Promises

The landmark Australian Tasmanian Dams case celebrated its 30th anniversary in August 2013. This case was a turning point for Australia. It had significant implications both for the interpretation of federal constitutional powers as well as the political relationship between the Commonwealth and the States. In a 4:3 decision, the High Court of Australia held that the [...]

Disenfranchising the Disenfranchised? – Appeal Rights in the Immigration Bill 2013

Disenfranchising the Disenfranchised? – Appeal Rights in the Immigration Bill 2013

The first immigration bill to be published in four years was introduced in the House of Commons on 10 October 2013. The long title – ‘… to limit … access to services, facilities and employment by reference to immigration status …’ – leaves us in no doubt about its intent. The appeals provisions (clauses 11 and [...]

Al-Jedda: Judicial Commitment to the Universal Application of the Right to a Nationality

Al-Jedda: Judicial Commitment to the Universal Application of the Right to a Nationality

The Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006 provides that the Secretary of State may, as a general rule, deprive an individual of British citizenship where she is satisfied that this would be conducive to the public good. However, this is subject to an exception: such deprivation of citizenship is not permitted where the Secretary of [...]

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A Quick Overview

Blog posts have been coming in thick and fast over the last month. To help you get up to speed, the editorial team has put together a quick summary of some of the major themes. Justice Verma Committee on Indian sexual violence laws The Justice Verma Committee submitted its report on the reform of India’s [...]