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For love and money? Unpaid Legal Internships in the Third-Sector

For love and money? Unpaid Legal Internships in the Third-Sector

Recent litigation in the United States has successfully challenged the use of unpaid interns by large corporations. However, recent UK research indicates that ‘third-sector’ organisations – not-for-profits and charities – are amongst the highest users of unpaid interns. This is also true in the legal profession, where many social-justice oriented not-for-profit organisations rely upon this labour [...]

Ode v High Court of Ireland: the Right to Respect for Family Life is Alive and Kicking

Ode v High Court of Ireland: the Right to Respect for Family Life is Alive and Kicking

There is a constant undercurrent of scepticism in the UK regarding the role of human rights in the legal system. Many see them as a tool to be exploited by litigants to somehow cheat the system. However, the recent case of Ode v High Court of Ireland presents a pleasing example of judicial commitment to [...]

If the Human Rights Act were repealed, could the common law fill the void?

If the Human Rights Act were repealed, could the common law fill the void?

It now looks pretty certain that, if Justice Secretary Chris Grayling has his way, the Conservative Party manifesto for the election in 2015 will promise to repeal the Human Rights Act 1998 and to enact some alternative legislation. Earlier this year a retired judge of the High Court of Australia, Dyson Heydon, also suggested that [...]

Taking Conscience Seriously

Taking Conscience Seriously

Ladele (see previous posts) exemplifies an important public debate: has the embrace of gay equality by the liberal state become oppressive towards free conscience rights?   The legalization of gay marriage is troubling for many and the extension of anti-discrimination norms to cover sexual orientation may force many into painful dilemmas as to how they reconcile [...]

The role of public private partnerships in labour rights advancement

The role of public private partnerships in labour rights advancement

Public private partnerships (PPPs) are a new form of institutional organisation by which public organisations, civil society and major companies pursue collaborative and voluntary strategies to achieve a common goal. When in partnerships, organisations decide to undertake specific tasks, share risks, responsibilities, resources, competencies and benefits. PPPs have become popular in projects aiming at advancing [...]

Fundamental Human Rights and the Community Law of CARICOM

Fundamental Human Rights and the Community Law of CARICOM

In 1973, pursuant to the Treaty of Chaguaramas (ToC), the independent countries of the Commonwealth Caribbean and Montserrat (at the time a British Crown colony) established the Caribbean Community and Common Market (commonly known as CARICOM), with broadly the same aims and objectives as the European Economic Community, upon which it was generally modeled, save [...]

True Reconciliation Requires a Treaty

True Reconciliation Requires a Treaty

Treaties are accepted around the world as the means of reaching a settlement between Indigenous peoples and those who have settled their lands.  Australia is the only Commonwealth nation that does not have a treaty with its Indigenous peoples. We have never entered into negotiations with them about the taking of their lands or their [...]

Drones, Armed Conflict and Lawful Killing: Is the US at war?

Drones, Armed Conflict and Lawful Killing: Is the US at war?

On 12 November, Ben Emmerson QC, UN Special Rapporteur on Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights, addressed the use of drones at a seminar hosted by the Oxford Martin Programme on Human Rights for Future Generations and the Oxford Human Rights Hub. Many believe that the use of drones to kill persons that the US regards as [...]

Domestic Workers – The ILO Convention Comes into Force

Domestic Workers – The ILO Convention Comes into Force

On the 5th of September 2013, the ILO Domestic Workers Convention (C189) came into force. The adoption of the Convention and its supplementing recommendation, in June 2011, was a landmark moment for domestic workers and for the international labour law regime.  For domestic workers it entailed recognition that they are part of the paid labour market and [...]

Meet the new OxHRH Blog Editorial Team!

Meet the new OxHRH Blog Editorial Team!

The Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog is delighted to announce the appointment of three new Editors – Claire Overman, Rachel Wechsler and  Chintan Chandrachud!  They will join an ever-growing editorial team, led by our Managing Editor, Laura Hilly, to continue to bring you high quality human rights law news, analysis and commentary from around the [...]

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A Quick Overview

Blog posts have been coming in thick and fast over the last month. To help you get up to speed, the editorial team has put together a quick summary of some of the major themes. Justice Verma Committee on Indian sexual violence laws The Justice Verma Committee submitted its report on the reform of India’s [...]