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Why the U.S. Needs a Magnitsky Act for Venezuela

Why the U.S. Needs a Magnitsky Act for Venezuela

It has been a month since the Venezuelan people took to the streets to protest against the precarious situation in which the country is currently living. According to the UN Human Development Index, the murder rate in the country is the fifth highest in the world; annual inflation rates are currently over 50 percent. Furthermore, [...]

Lessons from Daimler

Lessons from Daimler

On January 14, 2014, as one of the first decisions of the new year, the United States Supreme Court held that Daimler AG (“Daimler”) could not be sued in federal court in California for injuries allegedly caused by conduct of its Argentinian subsidiary when this conduct took place entirely outside of the United States. The [...]

Secret Executions in India: Another Reason to Rethink the Death Penalty

Secret Executions in India: Another Reason to Rethink the Death Penalty

Secret executions of death row prisoners are increasingly becoming the order of the day in India. At least three (two ‘successful’, one failed) have been attempted in the last few months. These incidents have been characterised by three kinds of secrecy. First, where the prisoner sentenced to death was not informed in advance about the [...]

Drones, Armed Conflict and Lawful Killing: Is the US at war?

Drones, Armed Conflict and Lawful Killing: Is the US at war?

On 12 November, Ben Emmerson QC, UN Special Rapporteur on Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights, addressed the use of drones at a seminar hosted by the Oxford Martin Programme on Human Rights for Future Generations and the Oxford Human Rights Hub. Many believe that the use of drones to kill persons that the US regards as [...]

UN Immunity, Access to Justice and the Haitian Cholera Epidemic

UN Immunity, Access to Justice and the Haitian Cholera Epidemic

A few weeks ago a group of Haitian cholera victims took the extraordinary step of filing a class action suit against the United Nations in the Manhattan Federal District Court. The claimants ultimately seek compensation from the United Nations, alleging on the basis of overwhelming scientific evidence that the Haitian cholera outbreak was inadvertently caused [...]

Unpaid Interns in the New York Courts: Time to Start Spreading the News?

Unpaid Interns in the New York Courts: Time to Start Spreading the News?

Seen most cynically, employers deploy the label “intern” to give the impression that worker protection laws do not apply to people who look very much like workers, relying on financial and organisational barriers which prevent interns launching court challenges. A string of recent lawsuits brought by interns in New York marks a bold attempt to [...]

Guantanamo Military Commissions: Reflections from a Legal Observer – Part 3

Guantanamo Military Commissions: Reflections from a Legal Observer – Part 3

Editor’s note: This is the third and final post of a multi-part blog. To view earlier posts on this subject, please view Part I and Part II. In my last post, I laid out reasons why Guantanamo detainees currently before military commissions should be tried in federal court.  Of course, some counter arguments to this [...]

Guantanamo Military Commissions: Reflections from a Legal Observer – Part 2

Guantanamo Military Commissions: Reflections from a Legal Observer – Part 2

There is perhaps no more controversial space in the world than the U.S. Naval Station at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. For many, Guantanamo represents the very worst of the American prosecution of its post-9/11 conflict: executive overreach, detainee abuse and neglect, and modest judicial oversight.  As noted in Part I of this three-part post, Guantanamo, a military [...]

Guantanamo Military Commissions: Reflections from a Legal Observer – Part 1

Guantanamo Military Commissions: Reflections from a Legal Observer – Part 1

There is perhaps no more controversial space in the world than the U.S. Naval Station at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. For many, Guantanamo represents the very worst of the American prosecution of its post-9/11 conflict: executive overreach, detainee abuse and neglect, and modest judicial oversight.  In the purported balance between liberty and security, Guantanamo has come [...]

Cultivating a Common Bond: The Right to Adequate Education in South Africa and the United States

Cultivating a Common Bond: The Right to Adequate Education in South Africa and the United States

As the newest wave of education adequacy litigation crashes upon the shores of South Africa, courts there face the enormous task of breathing life into a socio-economic right that is at once amorphous and rapidly evolving.  But South African courts are not alone.  In the United States, several state high courts recognize the right to an [...]

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A Quick Overview

Blog posts have been coming in thick and fast over the last month. To help you get up to speed, the editorial team has put together a quick summary of some of the major themes. Justice Verma Committee on Indian sexual violence laws The Justice Verma Committee submitted its report on the reform of India’s [...]