A Conversation on Brexit’s Impact on Human Rights-Alison Young, Paul Craig, Nick Barber and Timothy Endicott (Oxford)
31 Jan 2017, 5:15pm | Gulbenkian Theatre, Law Faculty, University of Oxford

Brexit and the recent High Court decision in Miller v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union have raised many challenging questions on the powers of the executive, the principal of Parliament sovereignty and the future  of human rights in the UK. For instance, is Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty irrevocable? What would it mean for the process of leaving the EU if Article 50 is revocable? Does the European Communities Act, 1972 create statutory rights in the UK? What are the extent of the executive’s prerogative power? Does triggering Article 50 require Parliamentary approval? How will worker’s rights be protected without the driving force of the EU? How can we continue to ensure robust equality and non-discrimination guarantees?

Alison Young (University of Oxford) and Paul Craig (University of Oxford), who have blogged for the OxHRH extensively on these issues and Timothy Endicott (University of Oxford) and Nick Barber (University of Oxford) will be be discussing these and other pressing questions in a conversation on Brexit’s impact on the UK’s legal landscape. Given that the Supreme Court’s decision on Miller is due to be released in early 2017, this will be an invaluable opportunity to consider and reflect on the latest developments on Brexit.

This event is being co-hosted with the Bonavero Institute for Human Rights, the Public Law Discussion Group and the Programme for the Foundations of Constitutional Law and Government.

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Speakers

Alison Young
Alison L Young is a Fellow at Hertford College and teaches Constitutional law, Administrative law, Media law and Comparative Public law.

She studied Law and French at the University of Birmingham, before coming to Hertford College, obtaining the BCL and a DPhil. She was a tutor in law and a Fellow of Balliol College from 1997 to 2000, before returning to Hertford as a Fellow and Tutor in law in October 2000.

She researches in applied constitutional theory, public law and human rights. She is the author of Parliamentary Sovereignty and the Human Rights Act (Hart, 2009). She held a Leverhulme Research Fellowship from 2013-2015, using this to enable her to work part-time whilst writing her second book Democratic Dialogue and the Consitution (forthcoming: OUP 2017).
Paul Craig
Paul Craig, MA 1973, BCL 1974, Oxon, Gibbs Prize 1972, Henriques Prize 1973, Vinerian Scholar 1974. Professor in English Law since Oct 1998- St. John's College .

Formerly: Professor in Law 1996-1998 Worcester College; Lecturer, Magdalen College, 1974-75, Reader 1991-96.
Timothy Endicott
Timothy Endicott is a Fellow in Law at Balliol College, and has been Professor of Legal Philosophy since 2006. Professor Endicott writes on Jurisprudence and Constitutional and Administrative Law, with special interests in law and language and interpretation. He served as the Dean of the Faculty of Law for two terms, from October 2007 to September 2015.