Blog

Welcome to the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog!

Promoting dialogue between human rights researchers, practitioners and policy-makers from around the world.

Original contributions on recent human rights law developments across the globe, including case law, current litigation, legislation, policy-making and activism are welcome.

 

To contribute, read our guidelines or contact our editorial team at: oxfordhumanrightshub@law.ox.ac.uk 

 

Global Perspectives on Human Rights

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OxHRH

Racial Discrimination Act and Free Speech– Carte Blanche or Fair and Reasonable – Where are Human Rights in all This?

Liz Curran 27th February 2015

Professor George Williams has noted ‘the fact that freedom of speech receives no general protection in Australian law is not of itself and argument for introducing such protection’. Unlike in the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States and New Zealand there is no such right at a national level in Australia. There is a limited […]

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OxHRH

Recognising Travellers’ Needs: The Courts Begin to Move

Helen Mountfield 26th February 2015

Are courts beginning to recognize the duty of equality law to respect and protect the rights of minorities to be different?   A recent important High Court decision in Moore & Coates v Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (Equality & Human Rights Commission intervening) [2015] EWHC 44 (Admin), suggests that they may. Research […]

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OxHRH

Constitutional Court of South Africa: Blunting the Impact of Electoral Law on Freedom of Expression

Andrew Wheelhouse 24th February 2015

The Constitutional Court of South Africa has undertaken a robust defence of freedom of expression at the time of an election following litigation between the governing party and the official opposition in Democratic Alliance v African National Congress and Another [2015] ZACC 1. The case arose out of the scandal surrounding the use of public […]

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