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Promoting dialogue between human rights researchers, practitioners and policy-makers from around the world.

Original contributions on recent human rights law developments across the globe, including case law, current litigation, legislation, policy-making and activism are welcome.

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ECOWAS Court Rules that use of Military Tribunals to Prosecute Civilians in Nigeria Violates Right to Fair Trial

Tetevi Davi 15th November 2018

On 29 June 2018 the Court of Justice for the Economic Community of West African States (‘ECOWAS Court’) handed down its judgment in the case of Gabriel Inyang & another v Federal Republic of Nigeria . This decision has placed clear constraints on the use of military tribunals by states to prosecute civilians for non-military offences. […]

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South Africa decriminalises the private use, possession and cultivation of cannabis

Nabeelah Mia 2nd October 2018

On 18 September 2018, after more than a decade of perseverance by Mr Gareth Prince, his efforts finally saw fruition:  the Constitutional Court of South Africa decriminalised the use, possession and cultivation of cannabis in private for personal consumption in Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development and Others v Prince and Others.  The matter arose […]

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Indonesia’s New Counter-Terrorism Law and the Government’s Hidden Agenda?

Napat Rungsrithananon 17th August 2018

Following the suicide bombings by attackers with links to the Islamic State in May, the Indonesian Parliament has finally approved the long-pending revisions to the counter-terrorism law. While the determination to combat a surge in home-grown Islamist militancy is not to be doubted, there is good reason to fear that the government may have a hidden […]

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