Blog

 Welcome to the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog!

Promoting dialogue between human rights researchers, practitioners and policy-makers from around the world.

Original contributions on recent human rights law developments across the globe, including case law, current litigation, legislation, policy-making and activism are welcome.

To contribute, read our guidelines or contact our editorial team: oxfordhumanrightshub@law.ox.ac.uk

The Indian Supreme Court Reserves Judgment on the De-criminalisation of Homosexuality

Gautam Bhatia 15th August 2018

In 2009, the High Court of Delhi handed down a landmark judgment in Naz Foundation v NCT of Delhi. It read down Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code, which criminalized “carnal intercourse against the order of nature”, to exclude same-sex relations between adults in private – effectively decriminalizing homosexuality. Four years later, however, the […]

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Argentine Senate Rejects Bill on Abortion: The Way Forward

Sergio Giuliano 14th August 2018

The Argentine Senate has recently rejected, by a 7-vote margin, a Bill passed by the Chamber of Deputies on the voluntary interruption of pregnancy. The Bill was heavily debated both in Congress and Argentine society. The public hearings of the joint committee meetings of the Chamber of Deputies received 724 speakers in roughly 118 hours […]

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In Unregulated Spaces: Empowering Female Migrant Workers from India

Siddharth Sonkar and Sumedha Pal 6th August 2018

On 4 May 2018, Sheeja Das, an Indian migrant worker, was forced to jump off her employer’s residence in Muscat, Oman, to save herself from on-going violence. Sheeja broke her spine and legs – she will never able to live her life the same way again. On March 16, 2017, 46 year old Haseena Begum, also […]

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A Masterpiece of Judicial Avoidance?  

Roman Friedrich 31st July 2018

Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, 584 U.S. (2018), the U.S. Supreme Court’s blockbuster case, has been decided. The questions in dispute: 1. Can a person, exercising religious beliefs, claim an exemption from anti-discrimination laws? 2. Can a person be forced to engage in speech that goes against this person’s religious belief? These […]

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