Blog

 Welcome to the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog!

Promoting dialogue between human rights researchers, practitioners and policy-makers from around the world.

Original contributions on recent human rights law developments across the globe, including case law, current litigation, legislation, policy-making and activism are welcome.

To contribute, read our guidelines or contact our editorial team: oxfordhumanrightshub@law.ox.ac.uk

The Legality of Unilateral Child Conversion in Malaysia

Kamilia Khairul Anuar 16th March 2018

For Indira Gandhi, whose husband converted to Islam and attempted to unilaterally convert their daughter as well, a long legal battle came to an end when the Malaysian Federal Court handed down its judgment, declaring that the conversion had not followed proper administrative procedures and was therefore legally invalid. Being a Muslim is a legal […]

Read full article »

Argentine Supreme Court Strikes Down Mandatory Religion Classes in Public Schools

Sergio Giuliano 29th January 2018

In the recent case “Castillo c. Provincia de Salta”, the Argentine Supreme Court declared the unconstitutionality of a provincial norm that imposed religious education in public schools during school hours. The Court held that, while facially neutral and while allowing the possibility of parents to opt their children out of the classes, the norm violated […]

Read full article »

Triple Talaq and Women’s Rights in the Indian Supreme Court

Bhagirath Ashiya 13th October 2017

The Indian Supreme Court’s multi-religious Constitutional bench, in its much anticipated majority decision in the Shayara Bano case, has ruled the practice of triple talaq to be unconstitutional. The practice of triple talaq allows a Muslim man to divorce his wife instantaneously by pronouncing the word ‘talaq’ three times. This resulted in numerous social media […]

Read full article »

The Case For Recognition Of Muslim Marriages In South Africa

Shreya Munoth 12th October 2017

The South African Constitution guarantees all of its citizens the right to equality, dignity, freedom of religion and belief as well as the right to protection against arbitrary deprivation of property. Surprisingly, however, despite these guarantees, Muslim marriages, i.e. monogamous and polygamous marriages that are conducted in accordance with Islamic rites/the Shari’ah, are not legally […]

Read full article »