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 Welcome to the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog!

Promoting dialogue between human rights researchers, practitioners and policy-makers from around the world.

Original contributions on recent human rights law developments across the globe, including case law, current litigation, legislation, policy-making and activism are welcome.

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Trinity Lutheran v. Comer: Does The U.S. Supreme Court Now See Separation of Church and State as a Kind of Religious Discrimination?

John E. Taylor 11th July 2017

The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Trinity Lutheran v. Comer seems modest on its facts, but it moves the Court one step closer to a complete reversal of the “separation of church and state,” at least in matters of government funding of religious institutions.  Thirty-five years ago, governments were usually required to exclude religious institutions from […]

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The Devil’s in the Dictum: the Kenyan Court of Appeal Wishes Away the Inviolability of the Right to Hold a Religious Belief

Alvin Attalo 5th July 2017

High school students subscribing to the Seventh Day Adventist faith have cause for celebration. In Seventh Day Adventist Church (East Africa) Limited v Minister for Education & 3 others, Kenya’s Court of Appeal moved to guarantee their right to manifest their faith by observing Sabbath from sunset Friday to sunset Saturday. The case is of importance […]

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The Travel Ban as Religious Discrimination: Judges’ Engagement of Political Discourse and Recent History

Julie Suk 3rd April 2017

On March 15, 2017, two federal district courts, in Hawaii and Maryland, enjoined the enforcement of President Trump’s second executive order restricting travel from six predominantly Muslim countries.  In both of these decisions, the courts arrived at the conclusion that plaintiffs were likely to succeed on their claim that the travel ban constituted religious discrimination […]

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