Blog

 Welcome to the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog!

Promoting dialogue between human rights researchers, practitioners and policy-makers from around the world.

Original contributions on recent human rights law developments across the globe, including case law, current litigation, legislation, policy-making and activism are welcome.

To contribute, read our guidelines or contact our editorial team: oxfordhumanrightshub@law.ox.ac.uk

Gaining More from Human Rights: Access to Health Care and Surviving Childbirth is not Enough

Camilla Pickles 5th April 2018

Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 3 seeks to ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all, at all ages. Within the maternity care context this requires a reduction in maternal mortality rates by securing universal access to facility-based care and skilled attendance during labour and childbirth. However, research focused on obstetric violence, humanisation of birth, mistreatment, […]

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The Supreme Court of Canada Expands the Scope of Employment Discrimination

Joana Thackeray 14th March 2018

In December 2017 the Supreme Court of Canada released an important decision regarding the scope of discrimination “regarding employment” under provincial human rights legislation, in British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal v. Schrenk. The issue before the Court was whether protection from discrimination “regarding employment” under the British Columbia Human Rights Code extends to discrimination perpetrated by […]

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Uber and Out: Yet Another Victory for the Rights of Uber Drivers

Sandra Fredman 21st November 2017

In the UK Employment Appeals Tribunal (EAT) last week, Uber lost the latest case brought against it by its drivers. Across the world, a succession of lawsuits have sought to argue, usually with success, that Uber’s drivers are able to avail themselves of at least some of the protections of employment law. This is a […]

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The Dignity and Rights of Manual Scavengers in India

Swapnil Tripathi 14th October 2017

Manual scavenging has been called the worst surviving symbol of untouchability. The International Labour Organisation defines it as the removal of human excreta from public streets and dry latrines, and cleaning septic tanks, severs and gutters. The practice, though prevalent in other parts of the world, has a predominant presence in India. The people engaged […]

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The Taylor Review and the Zero-hours Contract

Mark Freedland 24th July 2017

In this note, I take a very brief look at the ‘Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices’ (‘TR’), concentrating on its main proposal regarding zero-hours contracting and using that as a focal point upon which to centre a view of this policy document as a whole.  Presented as an ‘independent review of employment practices’ led […]

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