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The Quick and the Dead in Britain’s Global Future

Helen Mountfield - 20th November 2012

David Cameron told the CBI on 19 November 2012 that he ‘got’ the need for changes of attitude in government, which he claimed were needed to strengthen Britain in a “global race”, in which “you are either quick or you’re dead”.  The detail of his proposals have serious ramifications for those who care about the […]

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The Quick and the Dead in Britain's Global Future

admin - 20th November 2012

David Cameron told the CBI on 19 November 2012 that he ‘got’ the need for changes of attitude in government, which he claimed were needed to strengthen Britain in a “global race”, in which “you are either quick or you’re dead”.  The detail of his proposals have serious ramifications for those who care about the […]

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OSCE Special Representative Maria Grazia Giammarinaro on the Role of Discrimination in Human Trafficking

Guest Contributor - 19th November 2012

By Maria Grazia Giammarinaro Human trafficking is a gross violation of human rights that occurs on a massive scale as vulnerable groups such as migrant workers are exploited by criminal groups. According to 2012 estimates by the International Labour Organization (ILO) 20.9 million people are victims of forced labour globally, though the organization stresses that […]

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Legal Aid in India: The Need for Strong Laws and High Minds

Guest Contributor - 18th November 2012

By Persis Sidhva The Indian legal system has been ineffective in promoting a pro bono culture. The Legal Services Authorities Act 1987 provides for free legal services to Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes, women and children without any qualification regarding their financial status, persons with disabilities, victims of human trafficking, persons with an annual income less than […]

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Studying Human Rights, Law and Practice

Guest Contributor - 17th November 2012

By Laurence Lustgarten After a busy two weeks on the blog,  Laurence Lustgarten asks us to step back and reflect on the study of human rights. ‘Human rights’ is a subject that increasingly attracts many public-spirited students around the world. For would-be lawyers, this usually means intense study of doctrine. Thirty years ago there was […]

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April Fools: The Quiet Demolition of Legal Aid

Guest Contributor - 16th November 2012

By Jo Renshaw Following the celebration of National Pro Bono Week in the UK last week, Jo Renshaw, Partner and Head of the Immigration Team at Turpin & Miller LLP, reflects on the impact of the impending cuts to legal aid in the UK and why pro bono work will not be enough to fill […]

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Justice and Security Bill: Report of the Joint Committee on Human Rights

Hayley Hooper - 15th November 2012

  This week the Joint Committee on Human Rights published its Report on the UK Justice and Security Bill. Hayley Hooper provides an overview of the Bill and the Report’s conclusions. Jeremy Bentham wrote that ‘publicity is the soul of justice’. Currently, the British government are of the view that where national security is at […]

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Pro Bono Work in South Africa: From Moral Duties to Legal Duties

Emma Webber - 14th November 2012

Continuing in our series on the state of pro bono legal work around the world, Emma Webber blogs for us on the possibility of making pro bono work compulsory in South Africa. The advent of democracy in South Africa meant that all citizens would in future be treated as equals before the law. However, almost […]

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Pro Bono Law in New Zealand: A Work in Progress

Max Harris - 12th November 2012

Following the celebration of National Pro Bono Week in the UK, this week we will be featuring updates on the state of pro bono legal work around the world. In this piece, Max Harris reflects on the past, present and future of pro bono work in New Zealand. New Zealand has a strong history of […]

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Prisoners' Voting Rights: The Gift That Keeps on Giving

admin - 9th November 2012

If ‘suffrage is the pivotal right’, then it is only fitting that the issue of prisoners’ voting rights has become the turning point of the UK government’s approach to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The last time a Strasbourg judgment provoked such a sharp response by the UK government was probably the 1995 […]

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Prisoners’ Voting Rights: The Gift That Keeps on Giving

Eirik Bjorge - 9th November 2012

If ‘suffrage is the pivotal right’, then it is only fitting that the issue of prisoners’ voting rights has become the turning point of the UK government’s approach to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The last time a Strasbourg judgment provoked such a sharp response by the UK government was probably the 1995 […]

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