Blog

Let Them Buy (Gay) Cake: Anti-Discrimination in Northern Irish Courts

Karl Laird - 27th May 2015

Over the weekend, the same-sex marriage referendum in Ireland dominated headlines around the world. The week before the referendum, the media’s attention was focused on Northern Ireland (‘NI’) and another case that touched upon same-sex marriage. In May 2014 Gareth Lee, a gay man living in NI, was planning to attend a private event to […]

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Hämäläinen v Finland: The Transgender Divorce Requirement in Strasbourg

Peter Dunne - 30th July 2014

In the landmark 2002 decision, Goodwin v United Kingdom, the European Court of Human Rights (“ECtHR”), citing an “unmistakable trend” among Council of Europe member states, established a general right for post-operative transgender persons (termed “transsexuals” in the judgment) to access legal gender recognition. In the absence of “concrete or substantial hardship or detriment to […]

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What next for LGBT equality?

Karl Laird - 11th June 2014

It has been almost a year since the Supreme Court of the United States delivered judgment in Windsor v United States and in the intervening twelve months there have been an increasing number of cases considering the constitutionality of prohibitions on same-sex marriage. As of June 2014, same-sex couples can lawfully marry in nineteen states […]

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From Torment to Tolerance and Acceptance to the Everyday: The Course of LGBT Equality in the UK

Jonathan Cooper - 3rd March 2014

Colonisation is a dodgy business. Laws are mainstreamed across the Empire. So what did the Romans, keen to distance themselves from their pre-Christian roots, ever do for gay men? They criminalised homosexuality: from 4th century the law was used to target same-sex sexual activity between consenting males on pain of death. And so it remained […]

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Surrogacy, Same-sex Couples and the Privatisation of Regulation in Israel

Jonathan Berman - 27th February 2014

On 30 January 2014, the Israeli Government published a draft bill on surrogacy. This proposed amendment to Israel’s 1996 surrogacy law, which was based on a deeply entrenched heteronormative vision of the family, will allow same-sex couples to take part in surrogacy procedures in Israel for the first time. The 1996 law defines the “parents […]

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Scotland’s Gay Rights Journey

Andrew Tickell - 10th February 2014

On 4 February 2014, MSPs passed the SNP government’s Marriage and Civil Partnership (Scotland) Bill into law, 105 votes to 18.  Exemplifying the disunities of contemporary UK politics, the Scottish equal marriage debate has been largely insulated from the wider UK discussion.  But this debate, and the new legislation, differs in important respects from the […]

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Scotland's Gay Rights Journey

admin - 10th February 2014

On 4 February 2014, MSPs passed the SNP government’s Marriage and Civil Partnership (Scotland) Bill into law, 105 votes to 18.  Exemplifying the disunities of contemporary UK politics, the Scottish equal marriage debate has been largely insulated from the wider UK discussion.  But this debate, and the new legislation, differs in important respects from the […]

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Over to you, Parliament – The significance of the Australian High Court’s judgment on same-sex marriage

Katie O'Byrne - 14th January 2014

A striking feature of Australian High Court jurisprudence in recent years is the Court’s use of orthodox judicial analysis to decide issues of deep political controversy and high significance for individual rights. This can be seen in the recent case of The Commonwealth v Australian Capital Territory (for further commentary on this case and its […]

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Naz and Reclaiming Counter-Majoritarianism

Vishwajith Sadananda - 9th January 2014

The term “counter-majoritarian” has, more often than not, been used in a derogatory fashion – especially when it is used to describe an institution like the Supreme Court. However, after the Supreme Court’s ruling on S.377 of the Indian Penal Code, whereby it re-criminalized homosexuality after four years of it being decriminalized in India, it […]

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The Crime of “Homosexuality” under Cameroon Criminal Law

Vincenzo Volpe - 16th December 2013

According to Human Rights Watch there are 76 countries in the world that prosecute people for having consensual sexual relations with a person of the same sex. In Cameroon,  the rate of enforcement of anti-homosexual laws  is amongst the highest on the globe. Over the past three years, charges have been brought against 28 people […]

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