Blog

 Welcome to the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog!

Promoting dialogue between human rights researchers, practitioners and policy-makers from around the world.

Original contributions on recent human rights law developments across the globe, including case law, current litigation, legislation, policy-making and activism are welcome.

To contribute, read our guidelines or contact our editorial team: oxfordhumanrightshub@law.ox.ac.uk

Hong Kong Court of Final Appeal ruled on refugee law gateway issue

Sebastian Ko 1st April 2013

On 25 March 2013, the Court of Final Appeal (CFA) in Hong Kong unanimously allowed an appeal by three asylum seekers, C, KMF and BF. The appeal is based on the repatriation orders of the Director of Immigration (DOI) of the government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR), which were made after the […]

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Supreme Court of Canada Delivers Judgment in Hate Speech Case

Guest Contributor 30th March 2013

By Lauren Dancer- In Saskatchewan (Human Rights Commission) v. Whatcott 2013 SCC 11the Supreme Court of Canada considered whether s 14(1)(b) of The Saskatchewan Human Rights Code which prohibits the publication of any representation ‘that exposes or tends to expose to hatred, ridicules, belittles or otherwise affronts the dignity of any person or class of […]

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Could the outcome in Windsor v US be a hollow victory?

Karl Laird 28th March 2013

Yesterday, the United States Supreme Court heard argument in Windsor v United States.  We have been closely following this case on the OxHRH Blog.  Today’s post will analyze the transcript of the hearing in order to see if we can get any hint of the direction in which this case might go.   The first […]

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Freedom of political communication and offensive speech in Australia

Guest Contributor 25th March 2013

By Boxun Yin – In Monis v The Queen [2013] HCA 4, the High Court of Australia considered the unique Australian doctrine of “implied freedom of political communication”. As Australia lacks a statutory or constitutional bill of rights, it is relatively rare for the High Court to be confronted with human rights questions. This was […]

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