Blog

 Welcome to the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog!

Promoting dialogue between human rights researchers, practitioners and policy-makers from around the world.

Original contributions on recent human rights law developments across the globe, including case law, current litigation, legislation, policy-making and activism are welcome.

To contribute, read our guidelines or contact our editorial team: oxfordhumanrightshub@law.ox.ac.uk

Gene patenting overruled but leaves lasting repercussions for minorities

Caroline Huang 19th June 2013

Last month, Angelina Jolie penned an op-ed piece in The New York Times about her decision to undergo genetic testing for BRCA mutations (breast cancer susceptibility genes 1 and 2), which greatly increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer. She also explained her choice to have a prophylactic mastectomy after testing positive for a […]

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Equality v Human Rights?: Same sex marriage and religious liberty

Aidan O'Neill 18th June 2013

This is an edited transcript of an address given by Aidan O’Neill QC on Thursday 13 June 2013, at Matrix Chambers on ‘Same Sex Marriage and Religious Liberty’ Some 50 years ago, in the wake of the publication in 1957 of the Wolfenden report which advocated a decriminalization of same sex sexual acts, a public […]

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Same Sex Marriage: Scaremongering and Sacrilege

17th June 2013

This is an edited transcript of an address given by Karon Monaghan QC on Thursday 13 June 2013, at Matrix Chambers on ‘Same Sex Marriage and Religious Liberty’ At stake in debates about same-sex marriage is not the right of persons holding firm religious beliefs to hold them or manifest them. What the deniers want, […]

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Mobile Phone Evidence: Implications for Privacy in South African Law

Guest Contributor 15th June 2013

Contemporary criminal investigations, particularly in cases of conspiracy and joint participation, routinely include search and seizure of mobile phones and access of their stored electronic data. This prompts two questions:  Does the core element of the right in question, viz a ‘reasonable expectation of privacy’, arise in the case of electronically stored information? And does […]

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