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 Welcome to the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog!

Promoting dialogue between human rights researchers, practitioners and policy-makers from around the world.

Original contributions on recent human rights law developments across the globe, including case law, current litigation, legislation, policy-making and activism are welcome.

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Malawi's Electoral Fiasco

admin 20th July 2014

Close to midnight on 30 May 2014, Prof Peter Mutharika was declared the winner of the fifth presidential elections in Malawi since 1994. This electoral contest was unusual in Malawi’s democratic era in at least two respects. Firstly, the Electoral Commission took 8 days and had to wait until the last hour of that period […]

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Malawi’s Electoral Fiasco

Danwood M Chirwa 20th July 2014

Close to midnight on 30 May 2014, Prof Peter Mutharika was declared the winner of the fifth presidential elections in Malawi since 1994. This electoral contest was unusual in Malawi’s democratic era in at least two respects. Firstly, the Electoral Commission took 8 days and had to wait until the last hour of that period […]

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Why Should Anyone Care About The UN? The UN Forum 2014

Natasha Holcroft-Emmess 15th July 2014

The UN Forum 2014, orchestrated by the United Nations Association-UK on 28 June, was the largest public event on the United Nations in recent decades. UN representatives explained to the public how the international organisation attempts to grapple with the most formidable challenges of our time. The first debate asked: why should anyone care about […]

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Mind the values gap: do we really believe in the Constitution?

Kayum Ahmed 14th July 2014

South Africans often proudly proclaim that our Constitution is one of the most progressive in the world.  Yet if you ask most South Africans how they really feel about gay rights and abortion, their answers, more often than not, contradict the values enshrined in the Constitution. Understanding this “values gap” between our personal values on […]

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Moral Arguments on the Right to Die: Should Courts Intervene?

Claire Overman 27th June 2014

On 25th June 2014, the UK Supreme Court, sitting as a full bench of nine, handed down judgment in the joined cases of R (on the application of Nicklinson and another) v Ministry of Justice, and R (on the application of AM) (AP) v Ministry of Justice and DPP. The full background to the cases, […]

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