Blog

 Welcome to the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog!

Promoting dialogue between human rights researchers, practitioners and policy-makers from around the world.

Original contributions on recent human rights law developments across the globe, including case law, current litigation, legislation, policy-making and activism are welcome.

To contribute, read our guidelines or contact our editorial team: oxfordhumanrightshub@law.ox.ac.uk

Tackling FGM In India: Is It Time For A New Law?

Tarika Jain 20th March 2018

According to a study conducted on members of the Bohra community in India, a startling 75% of the daughters of the 94 participants were subjected to Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C) around the age of seven to nine years, in accordance with their religious customs. A majority of the reported cases were of Type 1 FGM/C […]

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A Step Closer to Equality: LGBTQ+ Rights in the Inter-American Court of Human Rights

Alberto Soccol 19th March 2018

In a landmark advisory opinion delivered on January 9th, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights stated that the twenty-three states parties to the American Human Rights Convention must legalize same-sex marriage and allow people to change their name and gender marker in official documents according to their self-perceived gender identity. This is not the first […]

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CCTV Cameras in Classrooms: The Conflict between Security and Privacy

Rudra Deosthali and Chittkrishna Thakkar 18th March 2018

The Chief Minister of Delhi recently announced his decision to install CCTV cameras in all public schools, and to provide real time access to the footage to the parents of students, through a mobile application. This decision was considered necessary to ensure the safety and security of children in school, in light of recent instances […]

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The Legality of Unilateral Child Conversion in Malaysia

Kamilia Khairul Anuar 16th March 2018

For Indira Gandhi, whose husband converted to Islam and attempted to unilaterally convert their daughter as well, a long legal battle came to an end when the Malaysian Federal Court handed down its judgment, declaring that the conversion had not followed proper administrative procedures and was therefore legally invalid. Being a Muslim is a legal […]

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