Blog

Canadian Children have a Reasonable Expectation of Privacy at School

Michelle Bright - 20th March 2019

In R. v. Jarvis, the Supreme Court of Canada confirmed that children can reasonably expect that they will not be the subject of surreptitious recording by their teachers at school. High school teacher Ryan Jarvis was charged with voyeurism contrary to section 162(1)(c) of the Criminal Code of Canada after he secretly recorded female students while […]

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Under India’s New Intermediary Rules, Fundamental Rights Take Backstage

Purushotham Kittane - 15th March 2019

The Indian Government’s Information Technology Ministry had recently invited comments on proposed amendments to the existing guidelines for intermediaries mainly governing how social networks (and other intermediaries) facilitate the flow of information. Through this, the State seeks to come down harshly on the spread of fake news. This comes to fore as the world’s largest […]

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India’s Expanding Surveillance Scheme Violates the Right to Privacy

Aniruddh Nigam - 5th February 2019

On 20 December, 2018, the Ministry of Home Affairs in India issued an office order authorising a plethora of security and intelligence agencies to intercept, monitory and decrypt all personal data on computers and networks in India. The carte blanche nature of this authorisation raises significant concerns for the protection of the right to privacy in […]

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An Analysis of the Banning of the Hong Kong National Party and the Legitimate Restrictions on Freedom of Expression

Stephanie Tai - 28th November 2018

  On 24th September 2018, Secretary of Security John Lee issued a ban on the Hong Kong National Party (“the National Party”) under the Societies Ordinance on the basis that the National Party posed a “real threat to national security”. Section 8(1)(a) of the Societies Ordinance states that the Secretary for Security may prohibit the […]

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Aadhaar Verdict: A Middle Path

Nidhi Singh and Kushagra Mishra - 1st November 2018

The Supreme Court of India has emerged as a strong force in safeguarding the Constitutional values, and has had a memorable term of landmark verdicts, dealing with questions that relate to privacy, individual liberty and sexual freedom, to name a few. The Supreme Court in mid-2017 took the issue of ‘citizen’s privacy’, as discussed here. […]

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Mind the Gap: the Privacy Void in Brazilian’s Public Transport

Mariana Canto - 26th October 2018

In April 2018, the agreement entered into between ADMobilize and ViaQuatro, the administrator of the yellow line of the São Paulo subway, enabled the use of a technology to collect data related to the facial expressions of public transport users. Almost four months later, on August 30, 2018, an action was filed by the Brazilian […]

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Persecution of rights activists and voices of dissent in India

Vedika Pareek and Manya Oberoi - 8th October 2018

Recently, in a series of synchronized raids carried throughout India, various human rights activists and vocal critics of the ruling government were arrested under the Unlawful Activities Prevention Act (UAPA), an anti-terror law. These arrests have been widely criticized for being politically motivated as they are aimed at curbing the right of free speech and […]

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(No) Freedom of Speech at Universities?

Ewelina U. Ochab - 13th June 2018

Universities are meant to be places where freedom of speech flourishes. The issue of free speech in universities in the UK has been recently examined by the Joint Committee on Human Rights (the Committee), a parliamentary committee consisting of representatives of both Houses of the Parliament. The Committee considered the challenges encountered by students, lecturers […]

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The Assault on Media Freedom in Myanmar: A Worrying Trend

Didon Misri - 25th April 2018

When Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy party won a landslide victory in the November 2015 elections in Myanmar, bringing an end to nearly fifty years of authoritarian military rule, many local journalists saw the result as a triumph for press freedom. Two years into the democratically elected government’s term, however, press freedom […]

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CCTV Cameras in Classrooms: The Conflict between Security and Privacy

Rudra Deosthali and Chittkrishna Thakkar - 18th March 2018

The Chief Minister of Delhi recently announced his decision to install CCTV cameras in all public schools, and to provide real time access to the footage to the parents of students, through a mobile application. This decision was considered necessary to ensure the safety and security of children in school, in light of recent instances […]

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