Blog

Indian Supreme Court on Dance Bar Regulations: Victory for Bar Dancers?

Prankul Boobana - 12th March 2019

A two-judge bench of the Supreme Court of India (‘SC’) recently relaxed the stringent conditions imposed by the Maharashtra government for obtaining licenses and running dance bars, public establishments which are an important source of livelihood for female dancers. These dancers generally belong to the traditional dancing communities and are following their hereditary occupation. It […]

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“Insensitive Advertising” of Foreign Domestic Workers in Singapore: A Violation of Human Dignity

Benjamin Joshua Ong - 22nd December 2018

Singapore’s Ministry of Manpower has suspended the licence of an employment agency for advertising the services of foreign domestic workers in an “insensitive” manner which portrayed the workers as a “commodity that can be bought and sold”.  It also prosecuted the agency and the employee responsible for the advertisements; the employee has pleaded guilty. The […]

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Socio-Economic Rights and Land Reform in Scotland: Learning from South Africa

Douglas Maxwell - 3rd December 2018

Balancing the property rights of landowners with the socio-economic rights of communities and tenants has developed into a focal point in the contemporary human rights debate in Scotland. This has become one of the most controversial topics at Holyrood since the Supreme Court in Salvesen v Riddell [2013] UKSC 22 unanimously held that a provision relating to […]

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The Ogiek Evictions in Kenya – a failed legal solution

Christine Kahura - 25th October 2018

The Mau Forest is one of Kenya’s forest reserves, gazetted in 1954 to protect it from deforestation. In 2001, the government carried out an excision of the Eastern Mau region which constitutes 25% of the forest with a view to establishing a settlement scheme understood to be for the Ogiek community. The Marishioni location, Elburgon […]

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Internet Shutdowns: The Irony of a Digital Nation?

Mihika Poddar and Shardha Rajam - 5th July 2018

Between January to May (2018) alone, the Indian government imposed 55 internet shutdowns. An internet shutdown disrupts all electronic communications and services within a geographical location. Often, neither the reason for, nor the duration of these shutdowns is made transparent. In a digital age, these shutdowns interfere with much more than just free speech because they hinder […]

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Gaining More from Human Rights: Access to Health Care and Surviving Childbirth is not Enough

Camilla Pickles - 5th April 2018

Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 3 seeks to ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all, at all ages. Within the maternity care context this requires a reduction in maternal mortality rates by securing universal access to facility-based care and skilled attendance during labour and childbirth. However, research focused on obstetric violence, humanisation of birth, mistreatment, […]

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The Supreme Court of Canada Expands the Scope of Employment Discrimination

Joana Thackeray - 14th March 2018

In December 2017 the Supreme Court of Canada released an important decision regarding the scope of discrimination “regarding employment” under provincial human rights legislation, in British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal v. Schrenk. The issue before the Court was whether protection from discrimination “regarding employment” under the British Columbia Human Rights Code extends to discrimination perpetrated by […]

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Uber and Out: Yet Another Victory for the Rights of Uber Drivers

Sandra Fredman - 21st November 2017

In the UK Employment Appeals Tribunal (EAT) last week, Uber lost the latest case brought against it by its drivers. Across the world, a succession of lawsuits have sought to argue, usually with success, that Uber’s drivers are able to avail themselves of at least some of the protections of employment law. This is a […]

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The Dignity and Rights of Manual Scavengers in India

Swapnil Tripathi - 14th October 2017

Manual scavenging has been called the worst surviving symbol of untouchability. The International Labour Organisation defines it as the removal of human excreta from public streets and dry latrines, and cleaning septic tanks, severs and gutters. The practice, though prevalent in other parts of the world, has a predominant presence in India. The people engaged […]

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The Taylor Review and the Zero-hours Contract

Mark Freedland - 24th July 2017

In this note, I take a very brief look at the ‘Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices’ (‘TR’), concentrating on its main proposal regarding zero-hours contracting and using that as a focal point upon which to centre a view of this policy document as a whole.  Presented as an ‘independent review of employment practices’ led […]

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The Difficult Road Ahead: Overcoming the Stratified Home-based Care Regime in Latin America

Fernando Filgueira and Juliana Martínez Franzoni - 12th July 2017

Between 1990 and 2013 female labour participation in Latin American went from being 14 percentage points below to 4 percentage points above the global average. Today, 7 of every 10 women between 25 and 44 years of age are part of the labour force. Meanwhile, hours of unpaid domestic work and care among men remained […]

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