Blog

Liberalising Access to Abortion and Sex Education to Decrease Teenage Pregnancy in Kazakhstan

Adilya Zhilgildina - 5th April 2019

Teenage pregnancy rates in Kazakhstan are high, with 3443 births in 2017, much higher than during the Soviet period. As a means to decrease the prevalence of teenage pregnancy, the Vice Minister of Healthcare has proposed a more liberal abortion regime by making abortions more accessible to teenagers, providing access to birth control and introducing […]

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Legal Gaps in Securing Customary Land Rights in Zambia

Mwai Daka - 4th April 2019

The Asa Lato & 30 others case provides an opportunity for Zambia’s High Court to review legal gaps related to the conversion of customary land to registered leasehold tenure, especially those which make communities vulnerable to dispossession and landlessness. It also shines a light on the need for good governance and an end to corruption […]

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A Year of Gaza’s Marches of Return: War Crimes and Crimes against Humanity Targeting Protected Groups

Loureen Sayej - 30th March 2019

The independent international commission of inquiry on the protests in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem (OPT), recently released its report on possible international crimes committed by Israel within the context of the ‘Great March of Return’. The commission investigated the killing of 189 and maiming of 6000 Palestinians and paid special attention to […]

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Gym Use and Changing Rooms: the illegality and chilling effect of (trans)gender segregation

Peter Dunne and Alex Sharpe - 28th March 2019

A recent, high-profile article published on HuffPost claimed that the popular leisure group – David Lloyd Leisure – had decided to exclude all trans persons from their preferred gender segregated facilities unless they could produce a Gender Recognition Certificate (GRC). Given that only 4,500 GRCs have been issued (and that GRCs are not available to trans minors), this […]

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CJEU: Austrian Good Friday legislation constitutes direct discrimination on the grounds of religion

Diana Niksova - 27th March 2019

Under Austrian law, Good Friday is a public holiday only for members of the Evangelical Churches of the Augsburg and Helvetic Confessions, the Old Catholic Church, and the United Methodist Church. Hence, only members of these four Churches are entitled to an additional 14thpaid public holiday. They receive their regular salary if they do not […]

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African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights Affirms the Right to Access Documents Necessary for Appeals

Tetevi Davi - 25th March 2019

On 7 December 2018, the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights delivered its judgment in the case of Mgosi Mwita Makungu v. Tanzania. This judgment affirms states’ obligations to provide access to documents as part of an individual’s right to an appeal. It also clarifies aspects of the requirement to exhaust domestic remedies. Facts […]

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Canadian Children have a Reasonable Expectation of Privacy at School

Michelle Bright - 20th March 2019

In R. v. Jarvis, the Supreme Court of Canada confirmed that children can reasonably expect that they will not be the subject of surreptitious recording by their teachers at school. High school teacher Ryan Jarvis was charged with voyeurism contrary to section 162(1)(c) of the Criminal Code of Canada after he secretly recorded female students while […]

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Gloucester Resources and Its Radical Implications for Indigenous Environmental Justice

Sakshi Aravind - 18th March 2019

The decision by New South Wales Land and Environment court, Australia, rejecting the appeal by Gloucester Resources for the proposed Rocky Hill coal mine in Hunter’s Valley, has gathered public interest for all the right reasons (Gloucester Resources v Minister of Planning “Gloucester Resources”). The decision emphasized the incompatibility between new coalmines and Australia’s obligations […]

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