Natasha Holcroft-Emmess

Blog Editor

Natasha is a DPhil candidate in the Law Faculty at Oxford University. Her DPhil research focuses on derogation under human rights treaties. Natasha is also a Lecturer in Constitutional Law at Keble College, and she has a strong research interest in international law and human rights.

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The Politics of Global Health Data (with Sara Davis)

The Politics of Global Health Data (with Sara Davis)

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought questions around global healthcare financing and equitable access to treatments to the fore. But this is not the first time a spotlight has been thrown on the thorny issue of fair resource allocation ...
The Impact of Covid-19 on Workers’ Rights (with Michael Ford)

The Impact of Covid-19 on Workers’ Rights (with Michael Ford)

The spread of Covid-19 has affected many areas of our lives with major implications for our rights and freedoms. The instigation of a UK-wide lockdown has had an especially pronounced effect on our rights, and the burden of this ...
Coronavirus: States Derogating to Suspend Human Rights Obligations

Coronavirus: States Derogating to Suspend Human Rights Obligations

Governments around the world are taking decisive action to contain the spread of a novel coronavirus, (COVID-19), with heavy implications for human rights. Commentators have assessed containment measures in blogs on preventive duties, ...
Joint Committee on Human Rights Calls on UK Government to Justify ‘Presumption to Derogate’

Joint Committee on Human Rights Calls on UK Government to Justify ‘Presumption to Derogate’

The UK Parliament’s Joint Committee on Human Rights (JCHR) has written to the Secretary of State for Defence, Michael Fallon, requesting details about the Government’s proposal to derogate from the European Convention on Human Rights ...
Analysing Proposals for a ‘Presumption to Derogate’ from Human Rights Laws in Armed Conflicts

Analysing Proposals for a ‘Presumption to Derogate’ from Human Rights Laws in Armed Conflicts

On 4 October 2016, The Guardian reported that the UK Government will introduce plans to suspend the application of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) to the UK’s armed forces acting in future conflicts. Prime Minister ...
Whole Life Sentences in Hutchinson v UK – Compromise or Concession?

Whole Life Sentences in Hutchinson v UK – Compromise or Concession?

In Hutchinson v UK, the ECtHR again addressed the vexed question of the compatibility of whole life sentences with human rights law. This post analyses the Chamber decision, recognising the value of judicial dialogue, but ...
Why Should Anyone Care About The UN? The UN Forum 2014

Why Should Anyone Care About The UN? The UN Forum 2014

The UN Forum 2014, orchestrated by the United Nations Association-UK on 28 June, was the largest public event on the United Nations in recent decades. UN representatives explained to the public how the international organisation ...
Partially Clandestine Criminal Trials Risk Standardising Secrecy

Partially Clandestine Criminal Trials Risk Standardising Secrecy

In a decision handed down 4 June 2014, the UK Court of Appeal addressed the issue of secrecy in criminal trials on the grounds of national security. UK Government Ministers requested that a criminal trial be conducted entirely ...
Public Interest Lawyering in Times of Austerity

Public Interest Lawyering in Times of Austerity

On 24 May 2014, to mark its 14th anniversary, Oxford Pro Bono Publico presented a symposium on the importance of, and challenges to, the practice of contemporary public interest litigation. The symposium benefitted from a vibrant ...
Restricting Receipt of Rehabilitative Resources: The Prisoner Book Ban

Restricting Receipt of Rehabilitative Resources: The Prisoner Book Ban

New prison service rules prohibit prisoners in England and Wales from receiving books and essentials from the outside world. The imposition of a sweeping restriction on family and friends sending such items to their loved ones behind ...
Throwing Away The Key – Whole Life Sentences in the Court of Appeal

Throwing Away The Key – Whole Life Sentences in the Court of Appeal

Flouting the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) in Vinter v UK, the UK Court of Appeal has held that whole life sentences do not violate Article 3 ECHR (R v McLoughlin - see Neil Shah’s blog post from earlier last ...
Waking Up On The Wrong Side Of The Bedroom Tax

Waking Up On The Wrong Side Of The Bedroom Tax

To politicians and lawyers, the ‘bedroom tax’ is just media shorthand for statutory rules relating to housing benefit reductions for under-occupancy of housing association property, ushered in by the Welfare Reform Act 2012. To the ...