Oxford Human Rights Hub

The Oxford Human Rights Hub (OxHRH) aims to bring together academics, practitioners, and policy-makers from across the globe to advance the understanding and protection of human rights and equality. Through the vigorous exchange of ideas and resources, we strive to facilitate a better understanding of human rights principles, to develop new approaches to policy, and to influence the development of human rights law and practice.

Content by Author

An Equal Right to Freedom of Religion: A Reading of the Supreme Court’s Judgment in Sabarimala

An Equal Right to Freedom of Religion: A Reading of the Supreme Court’s Judgment in Sabarimala

Religious denominations cannot exercise their autonomy in a manner that degrades basic human dignity.
Comparative Bicameralism: A Survey of Global Approaches

Comparative Bicameralism: A Survey of Global Approaches

Bicameral relations are not static and the longer-term trend has been for upper houses to become less influential.
Proportionality and Constitutional Review

Proportionality and Constitutional Review

There is a temptation to think that issues of normative choice and balancing are more complex in public than private law. This should be resisted.
Reinvigorating Bicameralism in India

Reinvigorating Bicameralism in India

The bicameral structure of government was constitutionally designed to serve functions that enhance the autonomy of the individual.
Proportionality in India: A Bridge to Nowhere?

Proportionality in India: A Bridge to Nowhere?

The Indian Supreme Court's invocation of the structured proportionality test is a bridge to nowhere.
The Judicial Role in the Surveillance State

The Judicial Role in the Surveillance State

The courts' responsibility to check abuses of power is heightened in a context where secrecy reigns.
The Surveillance State, Privacy and Criminal Investigation in India: Possible Futures in a Post-Puttaswamy World

The Surveillance State, Privacy and Criminal Investigation in India: Possible Futures in a Post-Puttaswamy World

With a strong conception of privacy focussed on individual liberty after Puttaswamy, there is now a starting point for insisting on judicial oversight of surveillance.
New Beginnings: Indian Rights Jurisprudence After Puttaswamy

New Beginnings: Indian Rights Jurisprudence After Puttaswamy

Puttaswamy opens up the possibility of Constitution 3.0 that places the individual at the center and through a culture of justification prevents the State or social power from overwhelming the individual.
Using Science for Justice: The Implications of the Expert Consensus Statement on Zimbabwe’s HIV Criminalisation Law

Using Science for Justice: The Implications of the Expert Consensus Statement on Zimbabwe’s HIV Criminalisation Law

Criminalising HIV emboldens the dangerous myth that people living with HIV are culpable for the epidemic.
Any Act, Any Harm, To Anyone: The Transformative Potential of “Human Rights Impacts” Under the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights’ (2019) U of OxHRH J 120

Any Act, Any Harm, To Anyone: The Transformative Potential of “Human Rights Impacts” Under the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights’ (2019) U of OxHRH J 120

'Impacts' go far beyond 'violations' to cover any act that removes or reduces an individual's enjoyment of human rights.
‘Abortion, Reproductive Rights and the Possibilities of Reproductive Justice in South African Courts’ (2019) U of OxHRH J 88

‘Abortion, Reproductive Rights and the Possibilities of Reproductive Justice in South African Courts’ (2019) U of OxHRH J 88

Asserting individual reproductive autonomy affirms women's personhood, moral agency, bodily integrity and self-determination, and is foundational to their ability to participate equally in society.
“Women are not in the Best Positions to Make These Decisions by Themselves”: Gender Stereotypes in the Uruguayan Abortion Law’ (2019) U of OxHRH J 25

“Women are not in the Best Positions to Make These Decisions by Themselves”: Gender Stereotypes in the Uruguayan Abortion Law’ (2019) U of OxHRH J 25

Both sides of the abortion debate draw on gender stereotypes, pernicious attitudes about women, and dangerous rhetoric to justify their legislative position.