Laura.Hilly

Dr Laura Hilly is a barrister at the Victorian Bar in Australia. She practices in public, commercial and employment law with a special focus in her practice on anti-discrimination law and matters arising from the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibility Act (Victoria). Laura completed a BCL (with distinction), MPhil and DPhil at the University of Oxford where she studied with the support of a Rhodes Scholarship and a Clarendon Scholarship. Her doctoral thesis was supervised by Professor Sandra Fredman QC FBA and Professor Nicola Lacey CBE FBA and considered the impact of intersectional diversity on the decision making processes of final appellate courts in Australia, South Africa and England and Wales. She was also a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the University of Oxford, the Deputy Director of the Oxford Human Rights Hub and a former Chair of the Oxford Pro Bono Publico. Laura has taught in the areas of administrative law, human rights and litigation and dispute management at the University of Oxford, Australian National University and University of Melbourne. Laura’s undergraduate degrees are from the Australian National University, where she graduated with first class honours, the University Medal in Law and the Supreme Court Judges’ Prize. She is and Associate of the Oxford Human Rights Hubs, a member of the Board of Directors of Canberra Community Law and List G Barristers, member of the Victorian Bar Pro Bono Committee, Chair of the Open Justice Committee Sub-Committee at the Victorian Bar, Member of the Advisory Board of the Centre for Employment and Labour Relations Law at the University of Melbourne, and a Monitor for the Public Law section of the Commercial Bar Association.

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Thank you for following the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog in 2013!

Thank you for following the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog in 2013!

The Editorial Team at the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog is taking a break for the festive season.  We have escaped the Oxford winter to sunnier (or snowier!) climes. But we will be back in 2014, continuing to bring you high quality ...
For love and money? Unpaid Legal Internships in the Third-Sector

For love and money? Unpaid Legal Internships in the Third-Sector

Recent litigation in the United States has successfully challenged the use of unpaid interns by large corporations. However, recent UK research indicates that ‘third-sector’ organisations – not-for-profits and charities – are amongst ...
OPBP wins Law Works & Attorney General’s Pro Bono Award

OPBP wins Law Works & Attorney General’s Pro Bono Award

Oxford Pro Bono Publico (OPBP) was awarded the ‘Best Contribution by a Team of Students’ award in the 2013 LawWorks & Attorney General Student Pro Bono Awards, hosted at the House of Commons on Monday. Now in its 13th year, ...
57th Session of Commission on the Status of Women begins today: OxHRH CSW57 presents a special themed post series

57th Session of Commission on the Status of Women begins today: OxHRH CSW57 presents a special themed post series

The 57th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW57) begins today.  As delegates from around the world convene at the United Nations Headquarters between 4 to 15 March, the OxHRH Blog will host a special series of posts ...
Affirmative Action Themed Posts

Affirmative Action Themed Posts

Over the next two weeks, in addition to our regular blog posts, the OxHRH will run a special themed series on affirmative action.  We are excited to present contributions from network participants around the globe, focusing on this ...
State Sovereignty v Migrants’ Rights: Who Wins before the European and Inter-American Court of Human Rights?

State Sovereignty v Migrants’ Rights: Who Wins before the European and Inter-American Court of Human Rights?

On Tuesday this week, the Oxford Human Rights Hub (OxHRH) in conjunction with the Oxford Migration Law Discussion Group (OxMLDG) welcomed Professor Marie-Benedicte Dembour, Professor of Law and Anthropology at the University of ...
Australia’s new offshore processing laws for asylum seekers raise doubt over Australia’s commitment to fundamental human rights and beyond

Australia’s new offshore processing laws for asylum seekers raise doubt over Australia’s commitment to fundamental human rights and beyond

On 16 August 2012, the Migration Legislation (Regional Processing and Other Measures) Bill 2012 was passed in the Australian Parliament.  In broad terms, the laws were introduced as a measure to reduce the number of asylum seekers who ...