About the U of OxHRH Journal

The University of Oxford Human Rights Hub Journal (U OxHRH J) is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal on human rights. The U OxHRH J is dedicated to advancing the study of international and comparative human rights law. It publishes the highest levels of scholarship tackling the most pressing and challenging human rights issues and offers critical insights into current issues, debates and global trends.

The driving impetus behind the journal is the recognition that many academic institutions, NGOs, policy-makers and individuals are unable to afford the cost of high-quality, refereed journals. The U of OxHRH J is available freely online. Anyone can easily access the intellectually rigorous, interdisciplinary research on human rights offered by the U of OxHRH J.

The Journal Team

The U of OxHRH J editorial team is geographically diverse and brings a wealth of experience to the study and practice of human rights law.

U of OxHRH J Editions

OxHRH Journal Cover 2018

First Edition of the University of Oxford Human Rights Hub Journal

2018 | Volume 1

The first edition, arising from our partnership with the International Labour Organization and University of Kent, explores ‘A Better Future for Women at Work’

OxHRH Journal Cover 2019

Second Edition of the University of Oxford Human Rights Hub Journal

2019 | Volume 1

The University of Oxford Human Rights Hub Journal (U OxHRH J) is an open-access and peer-reviewed journal on human rights.

Jurisdictions

Extending Occupational Health and Safety Law to Informal Street Vendors in South Africa’ (2018) U of OxHRH J 61

Extending Occupational Health and Safety Law to Informal Street Vendors in South Africa’ (2018) U of OxHRH J 61

Street vendors make city life more vibrant. Providing health and safety facilities contributes to a hygienic environment in public spaces for all.
Pamhidzai Bamu-ChipunzaDownload "
The State Made Informalisation of Women Workers: A Case Study into Care Workers in South Korea’ (2018) U of OxHRH J 46

The State Made Informalisation of Women Workers: A Case Study into Care Workers in South Korea’ (2018) U of OxHRH J 46

When women are seen first as caregivers and only second as breadwinners, care jobs can then be more easily devalued.
Aelim YunDownload "

Submission Guidelines

We encourage all human rights scholars, from early career researchers to established academics, from around the globe to submit high-level academic submissions to the U of OxHRH J.

  • Submissions should be between 8,000 to 12,000 words (inclusive of footnotes)
  • Submissions should include an abstract of no more than 300 words
  • Submissions should be in Word format
  • The U of OxHRH J uses OSCOLA
  • Footnotes should be brief and not contain substantive text
  • Submissions must be exclusively submitted to U of OxHRH J
  • Submissions should make outstanding, original and argumentative contributions to the study of human rights

The decision to publish submissions will be based on an initial review by the editorial team and double-blind peer review. Journal articles that have successfully completed the review process will be published on a rolling basis to reduce the time between submission and publication.  Submissions can be emailed to: oxfordhumanrightshub@law.ox.ac.uk