OxHRH Celebrates International Women’s Day 2020: the Women of OxHRH

admin - 6th March 2020
OxHRH

OxHRH is celebrating International Women’s Day this year by spotlighting the brilliant work of the women of the Hub!

“Women and gender are central to all the work I do, from reproductive rights for women in our Shaping the Future series with the World Health Organization and the Office of the High Commissioner on Human Rights; to sexual harassment at work in our panel discussion with Dame Laura Cox and Judge Jenny Eady; monitoring Gender and Intersectionality as part of UN Women’s Counted and visible: Global conference on the measurement of gender and intersecting inequalities; women’s rights in the ECHR in “Women’s Human Rights in the Twenty-First Century” at the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg; and domestic workers in the gig economy as part of our Fairwork project in South Africa.”

– Sandy Fredman, OxHRH Director

 

“Gender power relations play a pivotal role in women’s poverty. My research focuses on the role of international human rights law in achieving economic justice for women.”

– Meghan Campbell, Senior Lecturer Law at University of Birmingham & OxHRH Deputy Director

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I work on issues of inequality, and in particular messy, complex or intersectional forms of discrimination. I use feminist theory widely and try to contribute some back in the process. I teach international and comparative human rights law. Currently, I am thinking about left populist justifications of human rights and would love to speak to anyone thinking about it too.”

– Shreya Atrey, Associate Professor in International Human Rights Law at University of Oxford & OxHRH Associate

 

 

 

 

“One of my current projects explores the existing vertical and horizontal gender based segregation within the legal profession in post-socialist Czech Republic.”

– Barbara Havelková, Shaw Foundation Fellow at Lincoln College & OxHRH Associate

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I explore how the constitutional guarantee of reproductive rights in India could be reimagined when viewed from the perspective of women’s rights to equality and non-discrimination.”

– Gauri Pillai, DPhil Student, University of Oxford

 

 

 

 

 

 

“My work analyses the limits of the law on sexual harassment to provide access to justice for women and the #MeToo movement. ”

– Monica Arango Olaya, DPhil Student, University of Oxford

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I’m currently working with the Hub to produce a series of videos on sexual and reproductive health rights, in partnership with the World Health Organisation and the Officer for the High Commission of Human Rights. The series explores how human rights law can assist in the fight for sexual and reproductive health, and tackles issues such as contraception, comprehensive sexuality education, and maternal mortality, among others.”

– Suzy Shepherd, Videographer, Oxford Human Rights Hub

 

 

 

“My research explores how participation rights may serve as an important tool for oppressed people to secure other rights, especially the right to housing in the context of evictions in India and South Africa. Evictions are a violent and oppressive act that not only deprive people of their homes, but deny their freedom and dignity, and further oppression along intersecting axes. I explore whether people facing oppression along intersecting axes, and therefore, especially black and dalit women, may find participation rights useful to re-assert their freedom and dignity, and fight oppression, in the context of evictions in India and South Africa.”

– Rishika Saghal, DPhil Student, University of Oxford

 

 

“I study issues of digital inequality — how the pervasive digitization of everyday life marginalizes and disenfranchises people without access to communications technologies. I work with people who are coming up with innovative solutions to close the digital divide in their communities, from building their own local internet networks to providing free access and assistance at public libraries. In order for people to access their rights in a digital world, we need to take a human-centered approach to technology development that prioritizes our humanity over technological efficiency.”

– Kira Allmann, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Oxford Centre for Socio-Legal Studies & OxHRH Communications Director

 

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