WATCH: A Conversation on Brexit’s Impact on Human Rights

by | Feb 1, 2017

On 31 January 2017, OxHRH, together with the Public Law Discussion Group, the Programme for the Foundations of Constitutional Law and Government, and the Bonavero Insttiute of Human Rights hosted  A Conversation on Brexit’s Impact on Human Rights in the Oxford Law Faculty.

You can now watch the recording of our Facebook Live stream of the event on our YouTube channel:

Brexit and the recent High Court decision in Miller v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union have raised many challenging questions on the powers of the executive, the principal of Parliament sovereignty and the future of human rights in the UK. For instance, is Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty irrevocable? What would it mean for the process of leaving the EU if Article 50 is revocable? Does the European Communities Act, 1972 create statutory rights in the UK? What are the extent of the executive’s prerogative power? Does triggering Article 50 require Parliamentary approval? How will worker’s rights be protected without the driving force of the EU? How can we continue to ensure robust equality and non-discrimination guarantees?

Alison Young (University of Oxford) and Paul Craig (University of Oxford), Timothy Endicott (University of Oxford), and Nick Barber (University of Oxford) who have blogged for the OxHRH extensively on these issues, will be be discussing these and other pressing questions in a conversation on Brexit’s impact on the UK’s legal landscape.

You can also listen to Alison Young discuss Brexit in our RightsUp podcast series, available on Soundcloud and iTunes.

 

 

 

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