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Colin Harvey is Professor of Human Rights Law at the School of Law, Queen’s University Belfast|Colin Harvey is Professor of Human Rights Law at the School of Law, Queen’s University Belfast|Colin Harvey is Professor of Human Rights Law at the School of Law, Queen’s University Belfast|Colin Harvey is Professor of Human Rights Law at the School of Law, Queen’s University Belfast

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The Future of Human Rights on These Islands

The Future of Human Rights on These Islands

Now that the idea of a new UK Bill of Rights appears to be buried, choices re-emerge. The predicted outcome of the London-based Commission’s work was finally confirmed in December. Where now for human rights? Thinking beyond the ...
R (Hodkin): A Signal to Rethink Religious Worship

R (Hodkin): A Signal to Rethink Religious Worship

By Ilias Trispiotis In R (on the application of Hodkin) v Registrar General of Births, Deaths and Marriages [2012] EWHC 3635 the High Court acknowledged that a broader definition of worship should be part of the future judicial ...
Brushing off moral case for pardon of Alan Turing may well turn into a legal case

Brushing off moral case for pardon of Alan Turing may well turn into a legal case

In this post human rights specialists and Alex Bailin QC of Matrix Chambers and John Halford of Bindmans LLP warn that if the government continues to brush off the moral case for Alan Turing to be pardoned, it may well face a legal ...
An Initial Reaction to the Commission on a Bill of Rights Final Report

An Initial Reaction to the Commission on a Bill of Rights Final Report

David Feldman, Rouse Ball Professor of English Law at the University of Cambridge and former Legal Adviser to the Parliamentary Joint Select Committee on Human Rights pens his preliminary thoughts on the final report released by the ...
The Ironies of Gay Divorce in Israel

The Ironies of Gay Divorce in Israel

By Dr Amir Paz-Fuchs It is a rare occasion that decisions by Family Courts in Israel receive front page headlines, as well as media attention abroad. But such an occasion materialized last week when a Ramat Gan Family Court approved ...
Redfearn v United Kingdom: Hard Case Makes Good Law- Part 2

Redfearn v United Kingdom: Hard Case Makes Good Law- Part 2

In Redfearn v United Kingdom, the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) held that the UK was under a positive obligation to enact legislation to protect employees from dismissal on the grounds of their political affiliations. In his ...
Redfearn v United Kingdom: Hard Case Makes Good Law-Part 1

Redfearn v United Kingdom: Hard Case Makes Good Law-Part 1

On 6 November 2012, the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) handed down judgment in Redfearn v United Kingdom. In a two-part post, Alan Bogg argues that the ECtHR reached the correct decision and considers the implications of this ...
Identifying forced labour

Identifying forced labour

Following her recent post on the OxHRH Blog,  Gwendolen Morgan returns with a post highlighting the issue of modern day slavery, and the need for the rights of those subject to forced labour, slavery and servitude to be vindicated ...
‘He Believed in People’: Remembering Arthur Chaskalson

‘He Believed in People’: Remembering Arthur Chaskalson

by Geoff Budlender Arthur Chaskalson, former Chief Justice of South Africa and a champion of human rights, passed away at the weekend. Geoff Budlender delivered the eulogy at his funeral this week.  This is an edited version of the ...
From Slavery to Strasbourg: The ECtHR makes the first Article 4 finding against the UK

From Slavery to Strasbourg: The ECtHR makes the first Article 4 finding against the UK

By Gwendolen Morgan In November 2012, the European Court of Human Rights handed down judgment in the case of CN v. UK. The court unanimously held that there had been a violation of Article 4 (prohibition of slavery, servitude and ...
Dismissal and the Band of Reasonable Responses; an unconventional approach to Convention rights?

Dismissal and the Band of Reasonable Responses; an unconventional approach to Convention rights?

By Heather Williams QC The Court of Appeal recently decided in Turner v East Midlands Trains Ltd [2012] EWCA Civ 1470 that the band of reasonable responses test (“BORR”), applied by Employment Tribunals to determine whether a ...
Unkind Cuts: UK Refugee Lawyers Cite Grave Concerns over Impending Legal Aid Restrictions

Unkind Cuts: UK Refugee Lawyers Cite Grave Concerns over Impending Legal Aid Restrictions

By Stephen Meili Following on from Jo Renshaw's piece on this blog about the impact of the legal aid cuts on immigration, Stephen Meili presents an insight into lawyers' perceptions of these cuts on asylum claims. As part of my ...