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The White Paper on the Great Repeal Bill: Part III – More Bad News

The White Paper on the Great Repeal Bill: Part III – More Bad News

This is the final post on the human rights implications of the White Paper on the Great Repeal Bill. The first post argued that there was some good news to...
The White Paper on the Great Repeal Bill: Part II – Bad News

The White Paper on the Great Repeal Bill: Part II – Bad News

In a previous post, I argued that there was some good news to take from the White Paper on the Great Repeal Bill. However, there are two main elements of...
We Are Never Out of the Hands of Men: The Contagious Diseases Act

We Are Never Out of the Hands of Men: The Contagious Diseases Act

In the 19th century, the Contagious Diseases Acts were passed in the UK and Ireland to curtail the spread of venereal disease among military personnel in certain cities. In this...
The White Paper on the Great Repeal Bill: Part I – Good News

The White Paper on the Great Repeal Bill: Part I – Good News

On Thursday 30 March, David Davis, the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, gave a statement in the House of Commons announcing the publication of a White Paper...
Essop v Home Office: Proving Indirect Discrimination

Essop v Home Office: Proving Indirect Discrimination

Yesterday, the UK Supreme Court gave a much-anticipated judgment in the case of Essop v Home Office, concerning the prohibition of indirect discrimination in the employment context. In an area...
Re-victimizing Victims of Sexual Assault: UK Child Benefit Laws

Re-victimizing Victims of Sexual Assault: UK Child Benefit Laws

In the last few years, the UK has been relentlessly pursuing austerity measures and drastically reducing welfare expenditure. Today, as part of this trend, the government has restricted access to...
First Group v Paulley: Towards Accessible and Inclusive Public Transport?

First Group v Paulley: Towards Accessible and Inclusive Public Transport?

First Group Bus v Paulley is the first UK Supreme Court (or House of Lords) case on reasonable adjustments in non-employment contexts. The case, which was supported by the Equality...
After Miller: Legislating for Constitutional and Democratic Legitimacy

After Miller: Legislating for Constitutional and Democratic Legitimacy

In Miller, the Supreme Court ruled by majority that ministers have no prerogative power to invoke article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union (TEU). The European Communities Act 1972...
The Law Commission’s Consultation on the Protection of Official Data

The Law Commission’s Consultation on the Protection of Official Data

The recent publication of the Law Commission’s consultation paper The Protection of Official Data has generated a great deal of attention. I welcome the opportunity to provide an overview of...
The EU (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill: Bargaining Chips on the Commons Table

The EU (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill: Bargaining Chips on the Commons Table

On 8th February, the EU (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill passed Third Reading in the House of Commons, by 494 votes to 122. MPs rejected all amendments to the 133-word Bill....
What’s in a name? The criminal implications of pleasantries

What’s in a name? The criminal implications of pleasantries

In September a new batch of research assistants started at the Law Commission in London. Having collected them from reception, I brought them over to meet the rest of the...
Miller, the European Union Withdrawal Bill, and the Non-explanatory Notes

Miller, the European Union Withdrawal Bill, and the Non-explanatory Notes

In her blog posting of January 24th 2017 about the decision of the Supreme Court in the Miller case, Professor Sandra Fredman very rightly observed that:- ‘One of the most...

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