Black Lives Matter: What Next After 2020

by | Oct 1, 2021

Black Lives Matter: What Next After 2020 is a blog series by the Oxford Human Rights Hub which explores how domestic and international law could be used to enhance, support and further the claims for racial justice which were made in various jurisdictions, during the 2020 global Black Lives Matter protests. Black Lives Matter is a human rights movement and, following the murder of George Floyd in 2020, thousands of people across the world protested against racial inequality. Indeed, as a co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement has made clear, ‘the reality is that anti-black racism is everywhere…this is not just one country’s issue, but literally a global occurrence’.

While much has already been written about the Black Lives Matter movement, most of the literature has squarely focussed on America and American legal reform and less attention has been paid to how other jurisdictions have tackled anti-Black racism. Moreover, it is notable that despite the founders of Black Lives Matter explicitly stating that the movement is a human rights movement, little has been written about Black Lives Matter with regard to international human rights law. This series will fill these gaps and provide a useful comparative resource for students, activists and scholars who seek to further their understanding of how the global struggle for Black lives to matter can be won.

This series has been expertly curated by Oluwaseun Matiluko and the OxHRH is indebted to her idea and hard work in bringing it together!

Oluwaseun Matiluko, ‘Black Lives Matter: What Next After 2020

Djamila Riberio, ‘The Exploitation of Racism and Misogyny by Twitter and the Struggle of Black People in Brazil’

Ife Thompson, ‘Using UN Frameworks to Further Racial Justice in the Britain’ 

Thalia Anthony, ‘First Nations Death in Custody and the Politics of Denial’

Zinat Jimada , Addressing Police Brutality in Nigeria: A Crisis of Non-Implementation 

Anika Gray, ‘Why Punitive Policies and Laws Will Not Solve Violent Crime in Jamaica’

Olivia Murray, ‘Reformists Overtook US Political Discourse on Ending Police Violence and Changed Nothing’

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